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Occupy Wall Str… Abril 14, 2012

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in Uncategorized.
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Occupy Wall Street activism in 2011 suddenly tied global cities associated with the boom times of financial globalization with a world of discontent with global dispossession.  Doing so most novelly within the affluent  urban control centers  and partially-privatized public spaces  of American capitalism,  the direct action of the encampments and associated protests also made a global capitalist class – the so-called 1% – a new focus for global critique.  As Naomi Klein explained in a speech to Occupy activists at Zucotti Park, there was therefore an important political geographic shift made manifest in this critique: a shift from a geography of blaming territories – wealthy nationstates – to targeting the transnational geographies of class domination.  “It seems as if there aren’t any more rich countries,” she underlined. “Just a whole lot of rich people. People who got rich looting the public wealth and exhausting natural resources around the world. The point is today everyone can see that the system is deeply unjust and careening out of control” (Klein, 2011).  Here I want to argue that this shift was also very much a cultural geographic shift too, partly because of how it reframed and communicated concerns about global class domination with local spatial action, but also  because of how it simultaneously made clear the world-wide resonance and relays of the  activism in articulating new communities of cross-border and cross-cultural solidarity.   Critical awareness about the global system careening out of control was thereby spreading from places in the Global South where it had been long obvious to places of former plenty and power.  “The world has come to Occupy Wall Street,” noted Andy Kroll, in an article that went on to document the multiple cross-cultural connections articulated by and in the new global-local ties.

From Global Dispossession to Local Repossession: Towards a Worldly Cultural Geography of Occupy Activism, by Matthew Sparke, University of Washington

(uma interessante análise que valerá a pena ler. aqui texto completo)

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