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(cfp) War on women? Feminist geographies of trouble/hope in the authoritarian turn Janeiro 14, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, Feminismos, geografias, teoria e epistemologia da geografia.
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War on women? Feminist geographies of trouble/hope in the authoritarian turn

Sponsored by the Gender and Feminist Geographies Research Group

CALL FOR PAPERS RGS-IBG ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2019
28th August – 30th August 2019, London

The rise of illiberal democracy and nativist populism has provoked suggestions both within the academic literature and popular discourse that we are now witnessing a ‘global authoritarian turn’ (Handel and Dayan 2017). Yet beneath the explicit nationalism of authoritarian political discourse, a subtler but no less important battle is raging along the axis of gender. From growing anti-abortion rhetoric in the US to Duterte’s suggestions of impunity for military rape in the Philippines, women’s bodies have become the biopolitical locus of a movement that is ‘waging war on women’ (The Atlantic 2018). 

Authoritarian environments are, therefore, increasingly spaces of trouble for women who embody the spectre of illiberalism as their rights and freedoms are stripped away by male-dominated authoritarian regimes (Spierings and Zaslove 2015). This occurs, among other means, through the symbiotic attrition of neo-conservative equality outrage and neoliberal welfare outage. Whilst this suggests the renewed importance of a gendered lens for understanding unfolding intersectional oppressions within the ascendancy of illiberalism, the authoritarian turn has instead brought an existential challenge to feminist scholarship itself. Here, for example, in Hungary, Victor Orbán’s government has banned the teaching of gender studies in public universities. Yet women are not merely passive objects of authoritarian statecraft but inhabit, instead, contradictory roles among its architects and prime antagonists. In terms of the latter, women’s mobilisations – from the Women’s March in the US to Poland’s Black Protest – offer ‘spaces of hope’ (Harvey 2002) amidst the crisis: sites from which alternative politics are devised and pursued.

In this session, we invite critical geographical interventions on the gendered embodiment of the authoritarian turn, inviting in particular feminist reflections that unpack the contradictory and multiple gendered dimensions of the ascendance of illiberalism. Theoretical and empirical debates on all themes are welcomed, as well as papers dealing with the challenges of practising feminist scholarship in illiberal contexts – whether in the field or the academy.

Please contact the session convenor, Sabina Lawreniuk (sabina.lawreniuk@rhul.ac.uk), with any questions if you are interested in presenting or send an abstract of ~250 words by 12th February 2019.

Anúncios

o medo como afeto político Janeiro 11, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in activismo, teoria social.
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O medo como afeto político, por exemplo, tende a construir a imagem da sociedade como corpo tendencialmente paranóico, preso à lógica securitária do que deve se imunizar contra toda violência que coloca em risco o princípio unitário da vida social. Imunidade que precisa da perpetuação funcional de um estado potencial de insegurança absoluta vinda não apenas do risco exterior, mas da violência imanente da relação entre indivíduos. Imagina-se, por outro lado, que a esperança seria o afeto capaz de se contrapor a esse corpo paranoico. No entanto, talvez não exista nada menos certo do que isso. Em primeiro lugar, porque não há poder que se fundamente exclusivamente no medo. Há sempre uma positividade a dar às estruturas de poder sua força de duração. Poder é, sempre e também, uma questão de promessas de êxtase e de superação de limites. Ele não é só culpa e coerção, mas também esperança de gozo. Nada nem ninguém consegue impor seu domínio sem entreabrir as portas para alguma forma de êxtase e gozo. Por isso, como sabemos desde Spinoza, “metis” e “sper” se complementam, há uma relação pendular entre os dois: “não há esperança sem medo, nem medo sem esperança”.Daí por que “viver sem esperança”, disse uma vez Lacan, “é também viver sem medo”.

Vladimir Safatle, “Circuitos dos Afetos – Corpos políticos, Desamparo, Fim do Indivíduo”, São Paulo: Cosac Naify, 2015

(pmr33) a solidão dos homens cansados Janeiro 9, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in poemas, poesia.
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The Tired Man (c.1956) Robert Dickerson

A

cada dia que passa me sinto mais fatigado. Um

homem procura ternura

no seu regresso a casa (um

homem não vê o instante em que despe

o ultraje) quando

sai de pés descalços pelo soalho da tarde em

busca de um

copo de olvido. Um homem conhece a casa

pelo gato à janela –

duas pupilas acesas sentam-se

à mesma mesa

sentam-se à mesa da alma. E a casa recebe o homem

com uma noite sempre nova

(um homem entrega tudo a quem o

salve do exílio)

quem lhe aplaque a solidão que existe nos

homens cansados.

“Nómada” de João Luís Barreto Guimarães, Quetzal, Lisboa, 2018, pp. 65

(cfp) Heteroactivism, Homonationalism and National Projects Janeiro 8, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, geografias das sexualidades, geographies of sexualities, lgbt no mundo, queer theory, teoria queer, Uncategorized.
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Heteroactivism, Homonationalism and National Projects

Call for Papers for session at the Royal Geographical Society with Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG) Conference, London 28-30 August 2019

Stefanie C. Boulila (University of Göttingen), Kath Browne (Maynooth University) and Catherine Jean Nash (Brock University),

Call for Papers for a session at the Annual International Conference of the Royal Geographical Society with Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG), London 28-30 August 2019. Sponsored by the Space, Sexualities and Queer Research Group.

It has long been argued that the national project is inherently heteronormative – creating and celebrating specific family forms, as well as reiterating nationalistic visions through gendered and sexualised normativities (e.g. Binnie and Bell, 2000; Sharp, 1996; Yuval-Davis 1997). More recently, investigations of homonationalism have explored the cooption and use of (white) lesbian and gay ‘acceptances’ often in the form of civil unions to reproduce the national project, affirm racial hierarchies and engage in postcolonial military conflict (e.g. Puar, 2007; El-Tayeb 2011, Haritaworn 2012). At the same time there have been new forms of resistances to sexual and gender equalities, including anti-gender campaigns. As an analytical category, heteroactivism opens up a space to examine these phenomena relationally as well as in their heterogeneity (Browne and Nash, 2017).

The securitization of borders, the rise of populism and the far right in allegedly post-racial times require sexual and gendered analyses that engage with the multiplicities of support and oppositions to rights, equalities and intersectional justice. This session seeks explore the multifarious intersections of heteroactivism and nationalist projects. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Race, religion and oppositions to/acceptances of sexual and gender liberations
  • Modernity, Europeaness And LGBT/Women’s rights
  • University Cultural wars and governmental interventions 
  • Sexualities of the far right/populisms
  • Gender Norms and nationalisms
  • Opposing the Oppositions/acceptances Confrontation, debate and protest, the promise of oppositional politics
  • Heteroactivism and homonationalist affirmations

If you are interested in submitting a paper, please send your expression of interest including title, abstract of up to 250 words, and your name and institutional affiliation to the session to kath.browne@mu.ie, sboulil@uni-goettingen.de, and cnash@brocku.ca by 31st January 2019.

(cfp) Lesbian Lives Conference 2019 Janeiro 7, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, lgbt no mundo, queer theory, sexualidades e géneros.
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Lesbian Lives Conference 2019

The Politics of (In) Visibility

Call for Proposals

University of Brighton, UK, 15-16 March 2019

EXTENDED DEADLINE: 18th January 2019

Following a great response to this years CFP we are extending the deadline to give more people the opportunity to be part of this brilliant event. The theme for the 2019 Lesbian Lives Conference is The Politics of (In) Visibility. The 24th edition of this conference is hosted by the University of Brighton Centre for Transforming Sexuality and Gender in conjunction with feminist scholars from University College Dublin and Maynooth University. The organisers of this two-day international and interdisciplinary conference now welcome proposals from academics, scholars, students, activists, documentary and film-makers, writers and artists.

The Lesbian Lives Conference is not just the world’s most longstanding academic conference in Lesbian Studies, it is a large international event that draws speakers and participants from all continents and hosts the best-known as well as emerging scholars in the field. In the past we have hosted Emma Donoghue, Jackie Kay, Joan Nestle, Sarah Schulman, Cherry Smyth, Del La Grace Volcano, Sarah Waters, Campbell X and academics such as Sara Ahmed, Terry Castle, Laura Doan, Lisa Downing, Lillian Faderman, Sarah Franklin, Claire Hemmings, Alison Hennegan, Sally R. Munt, Helena Whitbread, Bonnie Zimmerman among many others.

Moving beyond the notion of the politics of visibility as meaning only the politics of being ‘out’ or being about erasure from cultural representation, the conference seeks to further probe what the politics of (in)visibility means to the LGBTQ community and individuals today.  With celebrity culture and new media is visibility still a burning issue? Although visibility has increased, there are still media representations drawing predominantly on limiting stereotypes; lesbians, bisexual women and trans folks continue to be marginalised; yet visual activism and expression; from painting, photography, and documentary making to romcoms, comics, YouTube serials, and slasher fiction are at the heart of LBTQ culture.

The conference also would like to invite delegates to think about the politics of (In) visibility beyond visual culture and media representations, to include broader notions of public life and spaces. Gay culture may be increasingly visible in some metropolitan areas but lesbian spaces and places continue to be invisible. Similarly, Pride may be considered a moment of public visibility for the whole of the LGBTQ spectrum, but also in this case visibility is shaped by commercial interests and this again marginalises LBT and other non normative perspectives and experiences. Beyond these particular examples it is also important to consider intersectionality in relation to societal aspects of power that  potentially render identities  either or both in- and hyper visible.

Proposals are welcomed on (though are by no means limited to) the following:

·      The relation of queer to lesbian visibility 

·      Visual activism

·      Revisiting debates about LGBTQ visibility and its discontent

·      (In)visibility and intersectionality

·      (Bi) invisibility in LGBT communities 

·      Visibility in mainstream media 

·      Fake news and tablodisation of sexual identities 

·      Social media and visibility 

·      Lesbian YouTube culture

·      Sexuality and Instagram

·      Dating apps

·      Film and screen studies 

·      Comics

·      Photography 

·      LGBTQ domestic photography and home movies

·      Lesbians in the archives 

·      The visual imprint of subcultures

·      The lesbian lens 

·      The lesbian gaze

·      LBTQ looks 

·      Youth and (in)visibility

·      Visibility and social class / disability/ race/gender

·      Visibility and invisibility of LGBT in museums 

The conference organisers welcome proposals for (A) individual papers, (B) sessions, (C) round table discussions, (D) workshops and (E) visual presentations.  We encourage submissions across all genres, both fact and fiction which align to the conference theme, and which have been produced between 2015-2018.

Lesbian Lives aims to build bridges across disciplines and explore less traditional forms of critical engagement with the politics of (in)visibility. In 2019, this underlying ethos of inclusiveness and dialogue will materialize in a fundraiser exhibition. Under the remit of “The Lesbian Lens”, we invite artists to digitally submit visual work: drawing, painting, photography and video. The exhibition opening will take place on the 15th of March and it will close a week after.

For papers, panels or workshops, please submit proposals of no more than 300 words to: sexgencentre@brighton.ac.uk clearly the information required as per the guidelines below, by the 18 January 2019. For submissions to the exhibition, please send your work to: J.Keane@brighton.ac.uk

If your proposal is selected you may be directed to a formal submission through our contributions and registrations site. For all further details please see https://www.facebook.com/Lesbian-Lives-Conference-2019-316502112413277/

The Lesbian Lives Conference is open to all genders and any political and sexual orientations. There is an ethos of welcome and accessibility. 

We particularly want to extend a welcome to bi and trans communities.

We look forward to welcoming you to the conference and to hearing the exciting papers, participating in the enlivening workshops, watching the phenomenal films and engaging in a process of learning and growth.

For regular conference updates follow us on twitter: @CTSG_Brighton

Best wishes, 

The Lesbian Lives Conference committee