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(cfp) War on women? Feminist geographies of trouble/hope in the authoritarian turn Janeiro 14, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, Feminismos, geografias, teoria e epistemologia da geografia.
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War on women? Feminist geographies of trouble/hope in the authoritarian turn

Sponsored by the Gender and Feminist Geographies Research Group

CALL FOR PAPERS RGS-IBG ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2019
28th August – 30th August 2019, London

The rise of illiberal democracy and nativist populism has provoked suggestions both within the academic literature and popular discourse that we are now witnessing a ‘global authoritarian turn’ (Handel and Dayan 2017). Yet beneath the explicit nationalism of authoritarian political discourse, a subtler but no less important battle is raging along the axis of gender. From growing anti-abortion rhetoric in the US to Duterte’s suggestions of impunity for military rape in the Philippines, women’s bodies have become the biopolitical locus of a movement that is ‘waging war on women’ (The Atlantic 2018). 

Authoritarian environments are, therefore, increasingly spaces of trouble for women who embody the spectre of illiberalism as their rights and freedoms are stripped away by male-dominated authoritarian regimes (Spierings and Zaslove 2015). This occurs, among other means, through the symbiotic attrition of neo-conservative equality outrage and neoliberal welfare outage. Whilst this suggests the renewed importance of a gendered lens for understanding unfolding intersectional oppressions within the ascendancy of illiberalism, the authoritarian turn has instead brought an existential challenge to feminist scholarship itself. Here, for example, in Hungary, Victor Orbán’s government has banned the teaching of gender studies in public universities. Yet women are not merely passive objects of authoritarian statecraft but inhabit, instead, contradictory roles among its architects and prime antagonists. In terms of the latter, women’s mobilisations – from the Women’s March in the US to Poland’s Black Protest – offer ‘spaces of hope’ (Harvey 2002) amidst the crisis: sites from which alternative politics are devised and pursued.

In this session, we invite critical geographical interventions on the gendered embodiment of the authoritarian turn, inviting in particular feminist reflections that unpack the contradictory and multiple gendered dimensions of the ascendance of illiberalism. Theoretical and empirical debates on all themes are welcomed, as well as papers dealing with the challenges of practising feminist scholarship in illiberal contexts – whether in the field or the academy.

Please contact the session convenor, Sabina Lawreniuk (sabina.lawreniuk@rhul.ac.uk), with any questions if you are interested in presenting or send an abstract of ~250 words by 12th February 2019.

(cfp) Heteroactivism, Homonationalism and National Projects Janeiro 8, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, geografias das sexualidades, geographies of sexualities, lgbt no mundo, queer theory, teoria queer, Uncategorized.
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Heteroactivism, Homonationalism and National Projects

Call for Papers for session at the Royal Geographical Society with Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG) Conference, London 28-30 August 2019

Stefanie C. Boulila (University of Göttingen), Kath Browne (Maynooth University) and Catherine Jean Nash (Brock University),

Call for Papers for a session at the Annual International Conference of the Royal Geographical Society with Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG), London 28-30 August 2019. Sponsored by the Space, Sexualities and Queer Research Group.

It has long been argued that the national project is inherently heteronormative – creating and celebrating specific family forms, as well as reiterating nationalistic visions through gendered and sexualised normativities (e.g. Binnie and Bell, 2000; Sharp, 1996; Yuval-Davis 1997). More recently, investigations of homonationalism have explored the cooption and use of (white) lesbian and gay ‘acceptances’ often in the form of civil unions to reproduce the national project, affirm racial hierarchies and engage in postcolonial military conflict (e.g. Puar, 2007; El-Tayeb 2011, Haritaworn 2012). At the same time there have been new forms of resistances to sexual and gender equalities, including anti-gender campaigns. As an analytical category, heteroactivism opens up a space to examine these phenomena relationally as well as in their heterogeneity (Browne and Nash, 2017).

The securitization of borders, the rise of populism and the far right in allegedly post-racial times require sexual and gendered analyses that engage with the multiplicities of support and oppositions to rights, equalities and intersectional justice. This session seeks explore the multifarious intersections of heteroactivism and nationalist projects. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Race, religion and oppositions to/acceptances of sexual and gender liberations
  • Modernity, Europeaness And LGBT/Women’s rights
  • University Cultural wars and governmental interventions 
  • Sexualities of the far right/populisms
  • Gender Norms and nationalisms
  • Opposing the Oppositions/acceptances Confrontation, debate and protest, the promise of oppositional politics
  • Heteroactivism and homonationalist affirmations

If you are interested in submitting a paper, please send your expression of interest including title, abstract of up to 250 words, and your name and institutional affiliation to the session to kath.browne@mu.ie, sboulil@uni-goettingen.de, and cnash@brocku.ca by 31st January 2019.

Geographies of Sexualities (Call for Papers: Special Issue of the Journal of Lesbian Studies) Outubro 25, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, geografias das sexualidades, geographies of sexualities, lgbt no mundo, teoria e epistemologia da geografia, Uncategorized.
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Call for Papers: Special Issue of the Journal of Lesbian Studies

Geographies of Sexualities

 

Guest Editor: Emily Kazyak

Email address: ekazyak2@unl.edu

Abstract deadline: November 1, 2018

Questions of geography, space, and location are integral to sexuality scholarship.  For instance, scholars have asked: How do LGBTQ+ identities, communities, and activism form in cities? How are rural areas, contrary to popular assumptions, also spaces where LGBTQ+ identities, communities, and activism occur? What role do LGBTQ+ neighborhoods play in the changing nature of cities? How do LGBTQ+ people build intentional communities? How does gender matter insofar as the migration patterns and residential choices for lesbian women and gay men often look different? How do race, class, and gender matter in LGBTQ+ urban spaces? More global and transnational perspectives open up questions including: How does migration matter for the ways in which people make sense of their sexuality? How do sexuality and gender identity inform the processes of seeking asylum? How do the categories, identities, and forms of activism that exist in one context or country not always translate to another context or country?

The goal of this special issue is to build on this scholarship and illuminate why it continues to be important for sexuality scholars to interrogate questions of geography, space, and location.

Contributors are asked to consider how binaries related to space, location, and geography inform understandings of sexuality and matter to the identities and experiences of lesbians. For instance, how are binaries such as urban/rural, private/public, center/border, South/North, migrant/native, global/local, salient?

Contributors may also interpret the theme of spaces more broadly and think about how sexuality matters and how the identities and experiences of lesbians matter in or are shaped by a variety of contexts, including but not limited to: families, schools, online communities, courtrooms, LGBTQ+ neighborhoods and communities, and pride parades.

The Journal of Lesbian Studies is an interdisciplinary journal and the special issue invites contributions from scholars in multiple fields and scholars using multiple methodologies and theoretical frameworks to understand the intersections of geography and sexuality.

Submit abstracts of 200-250 words, and a 2-3 page CV, to Emily Kazyak at ekazyak2@unl.edu by November 1, 2018. Acceptance notifications will be sent by December 1, 2018, and completed manuscripts are due March 1, 2018.

Trauma Geographies: Broken Bodies and Lethal Landscapes Setembro 20, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, teoria e epistemologia da geografia, teoria social, Uncategorized.
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The 2018 Antipode RGS-IBG Lecture – “Trauma Geographies: Broken Bodies and Lethal Landscapes” by Derek Gregory

The 2018 Antipode Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) Lecture

Trauma Geographies: Broken Bodies and Lethal Landscapes

Derek Gregory
Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies and Department of Geography
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada

We’d be delighted if you could join us at the RGS-IBG annual international conference on Wednesday 29 August at Cardiff University for Derek Gregory’s Antipode Lecture, “Trauma Geographies: Broken Bodies and Lethal Landscapes”. The lecture starts at 16:50 (Shared Lecture Theatre, Sir Martin Evans Building), and will be followed by a reception sponsored by Wiley.

Elaine Scarry reminds us that even though “the main purpose and outcome of war is injuring” this “massive fact” can nevertheless “disappear from view along many separate paths”. This presentation traces some of those paths, exploring the treatment and evacuation of the injured and sick in three war zones: the Western Front in the First World War; Afghanistan 2001-2018; and Syria 2012-2018. The movement of casualties from the Western Front inaugurated the modern military-medical machine; it was overwhelmingly concerned with the treatment of combatants, for whom the journey–by stretcher, ambulance, train and boat–was always precarious and painful. Its parts constituted a “machine” in all sorts of ways, but its operation was far from smooth. The contrast with the aerial evacuation and en route treatment of US/UK casualties in Afghanistan is instructive, and at first sight these liquid geographies confirm Steven Pinker’s progressivist theses about “the better angels of our nature”.

But this impression has to be radically revised once Afghan casualties are taken into account–both combatant and civilian–and it is dispelled altogether by the fate of the sick and wounded in rebel-controlled areas of Syria. For most of them treatment was dangerous, almost always improvised and ever more precarious as hospitals and clinics were routinely targeted and medical supplies disrupted, and evacuation impossible as multiple sieges brutally and aggressively tightened. Later modern war has many modalities, and the broken bodies that are moved–or immobilised–in its lethal landscapes reveal that the “therapeutic geographies” mapped so carefully by Omar Dewachi and others continue to be haunted by the ghosts of cruelty and suffering that stalked the battlefield of the Civil War in the years following Lincoln’s original appeal to those “better angels”.

Derek Gregory is Peter Wall Distinguished Professor at the University of British Columbia. He graduated from Cambridge with a double starred First and was appointed to the faculty there at the age of 22. His early work focused on historical geographies of industrialization and on social theory. He moved to UBC in 1989, where his research has focused on the ways in which modern war has–and has not–changed in the 20th and 21st centuries. After 9/11 much of his work addressed military and paramilitary violence in the Middle East (notably in The Colonial Present: Afghanistan, Palestine, Iraq [Wiley-Blackwell, 2004]) but more recently he has mapped the trajectory of Euro‐American military power from 1914 through to the present.

This has involved two complementary studies. First, a detailed analysis of the changing arc of aerial violence–from the First World War, through the combined bomber offensives against Germany in the Second World War, the bombing of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, to drone strikes over Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen and elsewhere–and second, an account of the embodied nature of modern war, centring on the evacuation of casualties, combatant and civilian, from war zones from 1914 to the present. The two projects have collided in an analysis of attacks on hospitals, healthcare workers and patients in war zones and their implications for both international law and the conduct of later modern war. These studies form part of two book projects, Reach from the Sky: Aerial Violence and the Everywhere War and The Purple Testament of War: Bodies and Woundscapes.

Derek’s research involves both archival work and interviews, but he is also keenly interested in the ways in which imaginative literature and theatrical performance can be incorporated into the research process–he was consulted in the early stages of Owen Sheers’ I Saw a Man and Guy Hibbert’s Eye in the Sky–and has developed a series of performance works related his research. He was awarded the Founder’s Medal of the Royal Geographical Society in 2006 for his contributions to social theory and human geography and blogs regularly at Geographical Imaginations: Wars, Spaces and Bodies.

 

Andy Kent
Editorial Office Manager
August 2018

(cfp) Here Versus There: Beyond Comparison in Queer and Sexuality Politics Setembro 6, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, geografias das sexualidades, geographies of sexualities, sexualidades e géneros, teoria e epistemologia da geografia, Uncategorized.
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(cfp) Here Versus There: Beyond Comparison in Queer and Sexuality Politics

National University of Ireland Maynooth, 18th June 2019

In sexual and gender politics, the Global North can be seen as ‘won’ and ‘sorted’, in contrast to a Global South that needs support to achieve Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and other sexual/gendered rights. This has specific effects both in places such as Ireland and the UK, where the politicisation of sexual and gendered lives moves ‘elsewhere’, and also for these ‘elsewheres’ marked as ‘unsafe’, ‘unfriendly’ and ‘backward’.  This conference is seeking papers, provocations and discussions that investigate both the creation of the binaries of here/there, Global North/Global South in terms of sexual and gender politics, legalities and geographies.

Academics, activists, policy makers and all who are interested are invited to submit a proposal to contribute to this one-day event. Contributions can take multiple forms, including presentations, films and artistic expressions.

It is anticipated that the day will be used to create a proposal for a special issue.

Accessible buildings will be used and there will be a sliding scale for registrations, including a free option for those who cannot pay.  For any other support needs, please let get in touch.

Proposals of no more than 250 words should be submitted here by Friday 30th November 2018: https://goo.gl/forms/Qjy7hC3tiE8EFSRM2.

 For further information please contact Kay Lalor k.lalor@mmu.ac.uk or Kath Browne Kath.Browne@mu.ie

A cidade em reconstrução. Leituras críticas, 2008-2018 Setembro 6, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, activismo, cidades, geografias, teoria social, Uncategorized.
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cidade

A cidade em reconstrução. Leituras críticas, 2008-2018” é um livro recém editado, organizado por André Carmo, Eduardo Ascensão e Ana Estevens, que resulta de uma parceria entre o Le Monde Diplomatique (ed. portuguesa) e a Habita – Associação pelo Direito à Habitação e à Cidade, que têm trazido à discussão um tema tão actual (pode consultar o índice aqui).

Os livros do Le Monde Diplomatique – edição portuguesa são editados pela Outro Modo Cooperativa Cultural, que tal como tantas outras cooperativas em Portugal tenta sobreviver e resistir mensalmente. É um projecto colectivo, político e crítico que edita o jornal e os muitos livros que já foram produzidos. Para garantir a verba necessária para a impressão do livro gostávamos de o convidar a adquirir em sistema de pré-venda o número de exemplares que desejar.

Esta pré-venda está a ser feita junto de amigos do jornal Le Monde Diplomatique – edição portuguesa e daqueles que antecipadamente queiram contribuir para a sua impressão, tendo a vantagem de o ler antes dele ser distribuído em Outubro com o jornal. Se o quiser fazer, contacte o Le Monde Diplomatique para o e-mail livros.lmd.pt@gmail.com.

 

 

Migration and Society – Advances in Researc Setembro 6, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, migrações, Uncategorized.
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Berghahn just announce the launch of an exciting new journal in 2018, Migration and Society: Advances in Research! The first volume will be published this fall. View the Introduction for the forthcoming volume.

Migration and Society  – Advances in Research

Editors
Mette Louise Berg, University College London
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, University College London

Migration is at the heart of the transformation of societies and communities and touches the lives of people across the globe. Migration and Society is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal advancing debate about emergent trends in all types of migration. We invite work that situates migration in a wider historical and societal context, including attention to experiences and representations of migration, critical theoretical perspectives on migration, and the social, cultural, and legal embeddedness of migration. Global in its scope, we particularly encourage scholarship from and about the global South as well as the North.

Migration and Society addresses both dynamics and drivers of migration; processes of settlement and integration; and transnational practices and diaspora formation. We publish theoretically informed and empirically based articles of the highest quality, especially encouraging work that interrogates and transcends the boundaries between the social sciences and the arts and humanities.

We also welcome articles that reflect on the complexities of both studying and teaching migration, as well as pieces that focus on the relationship between scholarship and the policies and politics of migration.

(cfp) TICYUrb’18: Third International Conference of Young Urban Researchers Setembro 3, 2017

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in cidades, geografias, Uncategorized.
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TICYUrb’18: Call for Papers and Posters:

 

The TICYUrb (Third International Conference of Young Urban Researchers) is an international event that aims to echo frontier research, artistic works and professional practice related to different urban contexts around the world, under an environment of vibrant dialog between academia and society.

 

The conference is split in ten tracks: Collectivecity (the right to the city: 50 years later), Productcity (the city as a product), Divercity (diversity in the city), Fractalcity (the city amid policies), Ucity (utopias and dystopias), Fearcity (in-security), Metacity (ways of thinking and making city), Transitcity (migrations and racism), RiskCity (risks in the city) and City O’clock (24 hours in the city). We encourage the submission of theoretical and empirical works about these topics. TICYUrb wish to act as a bridge between social, human, natural and all other scientific domains, so every paper will be welcomed and accepted for consideration.

 

We encourage the submission of theoretical or empirical works about these topics. TICYUrb wish to act as a bridge between social, human, natural and all other scientific domains, so every paper will be welcomed and accepted for consideration.

Abstract of max. 500 words and a short biography/Vita via must be submitted via the form in our web-site.

We accept papers in English, Portuguese, Spanish, and French.

Authors should let us know in which language they prefer to present their papers.

This event will be a platform for sharing ongoing or recent work, open debate and networking. In parallel with the conference sessions, there will be open debates among young professional, exclusive networking sessions, and field excursions, among other activities.

 

TICYUrb will be held in Lisbon from June 18th to June 22nd 2018 at ISCTE-IUL

 

TICYURB is a collaborative effort of the Centre for Research and Studies in Sociology (CIES-IUL), the Research Center on Socioeconomic Change and Territory (DINAMIA’CET-IUL), the Interdisciplinar Center of Social Sciences (CICS.NOVA), the Institute of Sociology – University of Porto (ISUP) and the School of Architecture of the University of Sheffield (SSoA).

For further information visit our websiteticyurb.wordpress.com

And follow us in Twitter @ticyurb and Facebookfacebook.com/TICYURB

IJURR 1977-2017: The 40th Anniversary Virtual Issue Junho 1, 2017

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, Uncategorized.
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Aqui fica um número especial da revista International Journal of Urban and Regional Research que comemora 40 anos em 2017. Um numero acessivel que começa com um texto de David Harvey de 1978 e que publica um interessante conjunto de textos.

 

Wiley
Celebrating 40 years of critical urban research
IJURR 1977-2017: The 40th Anniversary Virtual Issue
Celebrating 40 years of critical urban research
For this 40th anniversary virtual issue we invited all of the previous Editors to choose a small number of papers that they felt were of particular significance during their time of working with the journal. Each of the former Editors who participated in the compilation of this 40th anniversary virtual issue has provided a brief commentary next to their selections.
Read the introduction, commentaries and articles on www.ijurr.org
Explore the virtual issue, full introduction and commentaries
The Urban Process under Capitalism: A Framework for Analysis
David Harvey (1978)

World City Formation: An Agenda for Research and Action
John Friedmann and Goetz Wolff (1982)

Postfordism in Question
Andrew Sayer (1989)

Neo‐Marshallian Nodes in Global Networks
Ash Amin and Nigel Thrift (1992)

The Cultural Economy of Cities
A.J Scott (1997)

Symbolic Use of Globalization in Urban Politics in Tokyo
Takashi Machimura (1998)

Democratization and Politics in South African Townships
Janet Cherry, Kris Jones and Jeremy Seekings (2000)

Place in Product
Harvey Molotch (2002)

The Transnational Capitalist Class and Contemporary Architecture in Globalizing Cities
Leslie Sklair (2005)

Struggling with the Creative Class
Jamie Peck (2005)

The Market as the New Emperor
Anne Haila (2007)

Municipal Neoliberalism and Municipal Socialism: Urban Political Economy in Latin America
Benjamin Goldfrank and Andrew Schrank (2009)

Slumdog Cities: Rethinking Subaltern Urbanism
Ananya Roy (2011)

Lagos, Koolhaas and Partisan Politics in Nigeria
Laurent Fourchard (2011)

Gentrifying the State, Gentrifying Participation: Elite Governance Programs in Delhi
D. Asher Ghertner (2011)

Technifying Public Space and Publicizing Infra-structures: Exploring New Urban Political Ecologies through the Square of General Vara del Rey
Fernando DomÍnguez Rubio and Uriel Fogué (2013)

How did Finance Capital Infiltrate the World of the Urban Poor? Homeownership and  Social Fragmentation in a Spanish Neighborhood
Jaime Palomera (2014)

Absolute Traffic: Infrastructural Aptitude in Urban Indonesia
Doreen Lee (2015)

Reconstituting the Possible: Lefebvre, Utopia and the Urban Question
David Pinder (2015)

‘Eco’ For Whom? Envisioning Eco-urbanism in the Sino-Singapore Tianjin Eco-city, China
Federico Caprotti, Cecilia Springer and Nichola Harmer (2015)

Assembling and Spilling-Over: Towards an ‘Ethnography of Cement’ in a Palestinian Refugee Camp
Nasser Abourahme (2015)

Rethinking Urban Epidemiology: Natures, Networks and Materialities
Meike Wolf (2016)

Reappearance of the Public: Placemaking, Minoritization and Resistance in Detroit
Alesia Montgomery (2016)

Toward the Networked City? Translating Technological ideals and Planning Models in Water and Sanitation Systems in Dar es Salaam
Jochen Monstadt and Sophie Schramm (2017)

Informal Housing in the United States

Noah J. Durst and Jake Wegmann (2017)

Download the Virtual Issue
IJURR Volume 1 Virtual Issue (1977)
IJURR Volume 1 Virtual Issue (1977)
As part of the IJURR 40th Anniversary celebrations, we have also brought together the first volume of IJURR from 1977, as a Virtual Issue, introduced by the founding editor, Michael Harloe.

This Virtual Issue is free to view for one year

Download the Virtual Issue
Collage compiled from images in the public realm. We thank the Riley Foundation for permission to reproduce Michael Harloe – Vice Chancellor, Salford by Harold F. Riley, 2009, Oil on Canvas (© The Riley Archive, WB261. All Rights Reserved)

Cultural Geography Março 5, 2017

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, Uncategorized.
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CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY Cultural Geography is a series of intellectual and politicized engagements with the world. Cultural Geography is one of many styles of thought in human geographies that is not fixed within any particular time or space.

 

The academic field of cultural geography has been on a long path of unfolding intellectual thought and reshaping of academic idea’s. For most cultural geographers there are 5 clearly distinctive strands or themes across the discipline. These are not likely to be the only ones but seem to make sense when considering the contemporary Cultural Geographic Thought. The five strands or themes of Cultural Geography are as follows:

Culture as a distribution of things Includes everyday personal items we see around us regularly such as furniture, clothes and household items, as well as larger scale items, such as more public artefacts like buildings and transport networks such as railway line distribution and roads and monuments. This pattern of material artefacts can tell us a lot about the social, economic and political dynamics and dimensions of Cultures. A central concern of Cultural Geography

Culture as a way of life –  The most democratising and recurring aspect within Anglo/American/Australasian Cultural Geography by far. There has often been a profoundly relativist appreciation for the diversity in and through place, space and temporality.

A consistent theme is the assortment of practices that constitute people and place, life and landscape. The values, beliefs, meanings, languages, and practices that make up people way of life – these are however, mobile and mutable but still, have remained a centrality in Cultural Geography and Spatial Sociology (amongst countless other human geographies).

Culture as meaning – Understanding the meanings that people attach to places and to landscapes is no minor matter. For example, battles are raged on daily basis in order to control religious sites; city streets can become filled with people protesting the loss of space in the public sphere and loss fuel politics over design and location of war memorial sites.

Culture as doing – For some, such as Marxists, the perspective usually sees culture and cultural geography as something that is done. Recently, work has moved away from this Philosophical Anthropology and towards more general notions of life that can reinstate the Epicurean materiality, more often than not under the general heading of performance. This attempts to reinstate the worlds diverse richness which is often embedded in discourse and conventional academic accounts as a ‘given’ everyday life. When actually really thought abo,ut the world really is very overwhelming in its richness, causing more phenomenological and differing epistemologies. This is in order to understand action and affect – This geography tends to be overly hyperactive and almost comes over as ‘theatrical’.

Culture as power – In many significant ways this strand or theme of culture as power often stands out in comparison to the other four previously mentioned strands or themes, due to the fact that power is implicit in each of them, for example – meaning is contested. Even though power itself is not often subject to cultural geographical analysis, it is critiques of power that are usually of prominence in cultural geographical analysis, study and research

A predominant idea in Cultural Geography is, unsurprisingly, ‘thinking spatially about culture, and thinking culturally about Space’.

Over space and time ideas and understandings of power have shifted away from models based on the power of one group over others, but more towards the those involving the power to do things.

As Anderson et al (2003) point out that it is not only domination that power relations are based on in the modern world, but also ‘seduction, influence, persuasion, capacity, ability, manipulation, consent, compromise, subversion, control and so on.’

Geographical study and research on social stratification or ‘class’ seems to have been supplemented and also weakened by the geographical analyses of power relations built on political ideologies, gender, lifestyle, nature, race, sexual orientation, nationality, ethnicity and so on.

Analysis and critique of power remain of central importance to cultural geography as space is bound up in the constitution of justice, inequalities and oppression.

By pointing to the sites of oppression and resistance geographers have revealed the differing scales at which power relations operate and how space and spatiality’s are manipulated by both the powerful and the marginalised – In turn, geographers have become increasingly preoccupied with studying and researching the geographies of; Marxism; Feminism; Development and International Relations / Studies; Queer Theory; Postcolonialism; and the like. The main reason for the shift towards these ‘geographies’ is in order to better identify and understand the ways in which space, place and nature are implicated in, as well as, constitutive of unjust, unequal and uneven power relations. And of course with the aim of making suggestions of ways in which these relations can be addressed, contested and redressed.

 

via CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY — MatthewDavenport1985@Geography&Sociology