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(cfp) War on women? Feminist geographies of trouble/hope in the authoritarian turn Janeiro 14, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, Feminismos, geografias, teoria e epistemologia da geografia.
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War on women? Feminist geographies of trouble/hope in the authoritarian turn

Sponsored by the Gender and Feminist Geographies Research Group

CALL FOR PAPERS RGS-IBG ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2019
28th August – 30th August 2019, London

The rise of illiberal democracy and nativist populism has provoked suggestions both within the academic literature and popular discourse that we are now witnessing a ‘global authoritarian turn’ (Handel and Dayan 2017). Yet beneath the explicit nationalism of authoritarian political discourse, a subtler but no less important battle is raging along the axis of gender. From growing anti-abortion rhetoric in the US to Duterte’s suggestions of impunity for military rape in the Philippines, women’s bodies have become the biopolitical locus of a movement that is ‘waging war on women’ (The Atlantic 2018). 

Authoritarian environments are, therefore, increasingly spaces of trouble for women who embody the spectre of illiberalism as their rights and freedoms are stripped away by male-dominated authoritarian regimes (Spierings and Zaslove 2015). This occurs, among other means, through the symbiotic attrition of neo-conservative equality outrage and neoliberal welfare outage. Whilst this suggests the renewed importance of a gendered lens for understanding unfolding intersectional oppressions within the ascendancy of illiberalism, the authoritarian turn has instead brought an existential challenge to feminist scholarship itself. Here, for example, in Hungary, Victor Orbán’s government has banned the teaching of gender studies in public universities. Yet women are not merely passive objects of authoritarian statecraft but inhabit, instead, contradictory roles among its architects and prime antagonists. In terms of the latter, women’s mobilisations – from the Women’s March in the US to Poland’s Black Protest – offer ‘spaces of hope’ (Harvey 2002) amidst the crisis: sites from which alternative politics are devised and pursued.

In this session, we invite critical geographical interventions on the gendered embodiment of the authoritarian turn, inviting in particular feminist reflections that unpack the contradictory and multiple gendered dimensions of the ascendance of illiberalism. Theoretical and empirical debates on all themes are welcomed, as well as papers dealing with the challenges of practising feminist scholarship in illiberal contexts – whether in the field or the academy.

Please contact the session convenor, Sabina Lawreniuk (sabina.lawreniuk@rhul.ac.uk), with any questions if you are interested in presenting or send an abstract of ~250 words by 12th February 2019.

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(cfp) Heteroactivism, Homonationalism and National Projects Janeiro 8, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, geografias das sexualidades, geographies of sexualities, lgbt no mundo, queer theory, teoria queer, Uncategorized.
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Heteroactivism, Homonationalism and National Projects

Call for Papers for session at the Royal Geographical Society with Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG) Conference, London 28-30 August 2019

Stefanie C. Boulila (University of Göttingen), Kath Browne (Maynooth University) and Catherine Jean Nash (Brock University),

Call for Papers for a session at the Annual International Conference of the Royal Geographical Society with Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG), London 28-30 August 2019. Sponsored by the Space, Sexualities and Queer Research Group.

It has long been argued that the national project is inherently heteronormative – creating and celebrating specific family forms, as well as reiterating nationalistic visions through gendered and sexualised normativities (e.g. Binnie and Bell, 2000; Sharp, 1996; Yuval-Davis 1997). More recently, investigations of homonationalism have explored the cooption and use of (white) lesbian and gay ‘acceptances’ often in the form of civil unions to reproduce the national project, affirm racial hierarchies and engage in postcolonial military conflict (e.g. Puar, 2007; El-Tayeb 2011, Haritaworn 2012). At the same time there have been new forms of resistances to sexual and gender equalities, including anti-gender campaigns. As an analytical category, heteroactivism opens up a space to examine these phenomena relationally as well as in their heterogeneity (Browne and Nash, 2017).

The securitization of borders, the rise of populism and the far right in allegedly post-racial times require sexual and gendered analyses that engage with the multiplicities of support and oppositions to rights, equalities and intersectional justice. This session seeks explore the multifarious intersections of heteroactivism and nationalist projects. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Race, religion and oppositions to/acceptances of sexual and gender liberations
  • Modernity, Europeaness And LGBT/Women’s rights
  • University Cultural wars and governmental interventions 
  • Sexualities of the far right/populisms
  • Gender Norms and nationalisms
  • Opposing the Oppositions/acceptances Confrontation, debate and protest, the promise of oppositional politics
  • Heteroactivism and homonationalist affirmations

If you are interested in submitting a paper, please send your expression of interest including title, abstract of up to 250 words, and your name and institutional affiliation to the session to kath.browne@mu.ie, sboulil@uni-goettingen.de, and cnash@brocku.ca by 31st January 2019.

(cfp) Lesbian Lives Conference 2019 Janeiro 7, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, lgbt no mundo, queer theory, sexualidades e géneros.
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Lesbian Lives Conference 2019

The Politics of (In) Visibility

Call for Proposals

University of Brighton, UK, 15-16 March 2019

EXTENDED DEADLINE: 18th January 2019

Following a great response to this years CFP we are extending the deadline to give more people the opportunity to be part of this brilliant event. The theme for the 2019 Lesbian Lives Conference is The Politics of (In) Visibility. The 24th edition of this conference is hosted by the University of Brighton Centre for Transforming Sexuality and Gender in conjunction with feminist scholars from University College Dublin and Maynooth University. The organisers of this two-day international and interdisciplinary conference now welcome proposals from academics, scholars, students, activists, documentary and film-makers, writers and artists.

The Lesbian Lives Conference is not just the world’s most longstanding academic conference in Lesbian Studies, it is a large international event that draws speakers and participants from all continents and hosts the best-known as well as emerging scholars in the field. In the past we have hosted Emma Donoghue, Jackie Kay, Joan Nestle, Sarah Schulman, Cherry Smyth, Del La Grace Volcano, Sarah Waters, Campbell X and academics such as Sara Ahmed, Terry Castle, Laura Doan, Lisa Downing, Lillian Faderman, Sarah Franklin, Claire Hemmings, Alison Hennegan, Sally R. Munt, Helena Whitbread, Bonnie Zimmerman among many others.

Moving beyond the notion of the politics of visibility as meaning only the politics of being ‘out’ or being about erasure from cultural representation, the conference seeks to further probe what the politics of (in)visibility means to the LGBTQ community and individuals today.  With celebrity culture and new media is visibility still a burning issue? Although visibility has increased, there are still media representations drawing predominantly on limiting stereotypes; lesbians, bisexual women and trans folks continue to be marginalised; yet visual activism and expression; from painting, photography, and documentary making to romcoms, comics, YouTube serials, and slasher fiction are at the heart of LBTQ culture.

The conference also would like to invite delegates to think about the politics of (In) visibility beyond visual culture and media representations, to include broader notions of public life and spaces. Gay culture may be increasingly visible in some metropolitan areas but lesbian spaces and places continue to be invisible. Similarly, Pride may be considered a moment of public visibility for the whole of the LGBTQ spectrum, but also in this case visibility is shaped by commercial interests and this again marginalises LBT and other non normative perspectives and experiences. Beyond these particular examples it is also important to consider intersectionality in relation to societal aspects of power that  potentially render identities  either or both in- and hyper visible.

Proposals are welcomed on (though are by no means limited to) the following:

·      The relation of queer to lesbian visibility 

·      Visual activism

·      Revisiting debates about LGBTQ visibility and its discontent

·      (In)visibility and intersectionality

·      (Bi) invisibility in LGBT communities 

·      Visibility in mainstream media 

·      Fake news and tablodisation of sexual identities 

·      Social media and visibility 

·      Lesbian YouTube culture

·      Sexuality and Instagram

·      Dating apps

·      Film and screen studies 

·      Comics

·      Photography 

·      LGBTQ domestic photography and home movies

·      Lesbians in the archives 

·      The visual imprint of subcultures

·      The lesbian lens 

·      The lesbian gaze

·      LBTQ looks 

·      Youth and (in)visibility

·      Visibility and social class / disability/ race/gender

·      Visibility and invisibility of LGBT in museums 

The conference organisers welcome proposals for (A) individual papers, (B) sessions, (C) round table discussions, (D) workshops and (E) visual presentations.  We encourage submissions across all genres, both fact and fiction which align to the conference theme, and which have been produced between 2015-2018.

Lesbian Lives aims to build bridges across disciplines and explore less traditional forms of critical engagement with the politics of (in)visibility. In 2019, this underlying ethos of inclusiveness and dialogue will materialize in a fundraiser exhibition. Under the remit of “The Lesbian Lens”, we invite artists to digitally submit visual work: drawing, painting, photography and video. The exhibition opening will take place on the 15th of March and it will close a week after.

For papers, panels or workshops, please submit proposals of no more than 300 words to: sexgencentre@brighton.ac.uk clearly the information required as per the guidelines below, by the 18 January 2019. For submissions to the exhibition, please send your work to: J.Keane@brighton.ac.uk

If your proposal is selected you may be directed to a formal submission through our contributions and registrations site. For all further details please see https://www.facebook.com/Lesbian-Lives-Conference-2019-316502112413277/

The Lesbian Lives Conference is open to all genders and any political and sexual orientations. There is an ethos of welcome and accessibility. 

We particularly want to extend a welcome to bi and trans communities.

We look forward to welcoming you to the conference and to hearing the exciting papers, participating in the enlivening workshops, watching the phenomenal films and engaging in a process of learning and growth.

For regular conference updates follow us on twitter: @CTSG_Brighton

Best wishes, 

The Lesbian Lives Conference committee 

(cfp) Gayness In Queer Times Novembro 22, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, queer theory, teoria queer, Uncategorized.
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haleprin

(cfp)  Gayness In Queer Times

Workshop & Conference

University of Brighton, UK

June 13th & 14th 2019

Keynote speaker: Prof David Halperin (University of Michigan)

Author of ‘How To Be Gay’ and ‘Gay Shame’

Invitation from the conveners: Introducing the English translation of Mario Mielli’s 1977 ‘Towards A Gay Communism’, Tim Dean describes Mieli’s articulation of gayness as ‘loosening gayness from an exclusively sexual orientation to something more capacious’ (Mieli 2018:xi). Yet Mieli was writing before the emergence of queer theory, and in contemporary scholarly work around sexuality and sexual identity, queer appears to have achieved a hegemonic status. Over the past decade the articulation of theory or politics that is explicitly gay (rather than queer or LGBTQ) has often been attached to limiting, exclusionary, and oppressive practices, particularly regarding race and gender. As an unsurprising result, in both academia and activism ‘gay’ is frequently framed as the normative, assimilationist, and exclusionary past to queer’s fluid, radical, and inclusive present and future.

Yet critically engaging with what gay and queer mean (or could mean) nowadays can be elided precisely because of this problematic juxtaposition. While in many ways we broadly align ourselves with queer thought, we are sceptical of knee-jerk tendencies to unquestioningly surrender gay to a politics of exclusion and neoliberal assimilationism. We want to challenge and interrogate assumptions of how gay can be known and conceptualised, beyond conflation with / reduction to homosexuality. Consequently, this conference invites a focus explicitly gay scholarships, theories, identities, identifications, politics, cultures, histories, and futures. It asks:

‘Does gay have anything useful to offer in queer times?’

As part of its engagement with this question, the conference will include a limited-attendance half-day workshop with Prof David Halperin, focused on his influential text ‘How To Be Gay’.

We invite scholarly, activist, and artistic submissions. It has always been unclear how far queer scholarship, let alone gay scholarship, escapes a focus on gay men. Therefore we give special consideration to submissions by or about gay women, and gay people with other gender identities. Submissions might discuss some of the following provocations (though contributions beyond these are welcomed):

  • How can gayness be re/conceptualised? – identities, politics, activisms
  • What is gay culture, and what is the state of it now? – race, appropriation, mainstreaming
  • What opportunities and challenges do trans lives offer for understanding gayness?
  • When did gayness become exclusive? – bisexual, lesbian, & other ‘non-straight’ perspectives
  • How does gayness exist beyond gender binaries?
  • What are the vehicles of gay acculturation? – elders, spaces, media
  • How can gay space be made more trans-inclusive? – groups, bars, bedrooms
  • What are the boundaries of gay space, and what happens in its liminalities and margins?
  • Can or should gay escape its Western origins?
  • Do we need a re-engagement with radical gay writing? – histories, activisms, theories

To Apply: Please send abstracts of ~250 words, plus a short bio, to convenor Ian Sinclair (i.a.sinclair@brighton.ac.uk) by Friday Jan 11th 2019. Registration fees are on a sliding scale through £80 (institutional support), £40 (postgrad), and £10 (unsupported). A limited number of travel bursaries are available for presenters without any funding. We are happy to discuss your submission with you before the deadline.

The Gayness In Queer Times conference is convened by Dr Nick McGlynn, Ian Sinclair, and Sophie Monk. It is supported by the University of Brighton’s Centre for Transforming Sexuality and Gender, and the Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics.

Geographies of Sexualities (Call for Papers: Special Issue of the Journal of Lesbian Studies) Outubro 25, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, geografias das sexualidades, geographies of sexualities, lgbt no mundo, teoria e epistemologia da geografia, Uncategorized.
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Call for Papers: Special Issue of the Journal of Lesbian Studies

Geographies of Sexualities

 

Guest Editor: Emily Kazyak

Email address: ekazyak2@unl.edu

Abstract deadline: November 1, 2018

Questions of geography, space, and location are integral to sexuality scholarship.  For instance, scholars have asked: How do LGBTQ+ identities, communities, and activism form in cities? How are rural areas, contrary to popular assumptions, also spaces where LGBTQ+ identities, communities, and activism occur? What role do LGBTQ+ neighborhoods play in the changing nature of cities? How do LGBTQ+ people build intentional communities? How does gender matter insofar as the migration patterns and residential choices for lesbian women and gay men often look different? How do race, class, and gender matter in LGBTQ+ urban spaces? More global and transnational perspectives open up questions including: How does migration matter for the ways in which people make sense of their sexuality? How do sexuality and gender identity inform the processes of seeking asylum? How do the categories, identities, and forms of activism that exist in one context or country not always translate to another context or country?

The goal of this special issue is to build on this scholarship and illuminate why it continues to be important for sexuality scholars to interrogate questions of geography, space, and location.

Contributors are asked to consider how binaries related to space, location, and geography inform understandings of sexuality and matter to the identities and experiences of lesbians. For instance, how are binaries such as urban/rural, private/public, center/border, South/North, migrant/native, global/local, salient?

Contributors may also interpret the theme of spaces more broadly and think about how sexuality matters and how the identities and experiences of lesbians matter in or are shaped by a variety of contexts, including but not limited to: families, schools, online communities, courtrooms, LGBTQ+ neighborhoods and communities, and pride parades.

The Journal of Lesbian Studies is an interdisciplinary journal and the special issue invites contributions from scholars in multiple fields and scholars using multiple methodologies and theoretical frameworks to understand the intersections of geography and sexuality.

Submit abstracts of 200-250 words, and a 2-3 page CV, to Emily Kazyak at ekazyak2@unl.edu by November 1, 2018. Acceptance notifications will be sent by December 1, 2018, and completed manuscripts are due March 1, 2018.

Trauma Geographies: Broken Bodies and Lethal Landscapes Setembro 20, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, teoria e epistemologia da geografia, teoria social, Uncategorized.
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The 2018 Antipode RGS-IBG Lecture – “Trauma Geographies: Broken Bodies and Lethal Landscapes” by Derek Gregory

The 2018 Antipode Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) Lecture

Trauma Geographies: Broken Bodies and Lethal Landscapes

Derek Gregory
Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies and Department of Geography
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada

We’d be delighted if you could join us at the RGS-IBG annual international conference on Wednesday 29 August at Cardiff University for Derek Gregory’s Antipode Lecture, “Trauma Geographies: Broken Bodies and Lethal Landscapes”. The lecture starts at 16:50 (Shared Lecture Theatre, Sir Martin Evans Building), and will be followed by a reception sponsored by Wiley.

Elaine Scarry reminds us that even though “the main purpose and outcome of war is injuring” this “massive fact” can nevertheless “disappear from view along many separate paths”. This presentation traces some of those paths, exploring the treatment and evacuation of the injured and sick in three war zones: the Western Front in the First World War; Afghanistan 2001-2018; and Syria 2012-2018. The movement of casualties from the Western Front inaugurated the modern military-medical machine; it was overwhelmingly concerned with the treatment of combatants, for whom the journey–by stretcher, ambulance, train and boat–was always precarious and painful. Its parts constituted a “machine” in all sorts of ways, but its operation was far from smooth. The contrast with the aerial evacuation and en route treatment of US/UK casualties in Afghanistan is instructive, and at first sight these liquid geographies confirm Steven Pinker’s progressivist theses about “the better angels of our nature”.

But this impression has to be radically revised once Afghan casualties are taken into account–both combatant and civilian–and it is dispelled altogether by the fate of the sick and wounded in rebel-controlled areas of Syria. For most of them treatment was dangerous, almost always improvised and ever more precarious as hospitals and clinics were routinely targeted and medical supplies disrupted, and evacuation impossible as multiple sieges brutally and aggressively tightened. Later modern war has many modalities, and the broken bodies that are moved–or immobilised–in its lethal landscapes reveal that the “therapeutic geographies” mapped so carefully by Omar Dewachi and others continue to be haunted by the ghosts of cruelty and suffering that stalked the battlefield of the Civil War in the years following Lincoln’s original appeal to those “better angels”.

Derek Gregory is Peter Wall Distinguished Professor at the University of British Columbia. He graduated from Cambridge with a double starred First and was appointed to the faculty there at the age of 22. His early work focused on historical geographies of industrialization and on social theory. He moved to UBC in 1989, where his research has focused on the ways in which modern war has–and has not–changed in the 20th and 21st centuries. After 9/11 much of his work addressed military and paramilitary violence in the Middle East (notably in The Colonial Present: Afghanistan, Palestine, Iraq [Wiley-Blackwell, 2004]) but more recently he has mapped the trajectory of Euro‐American military power from 1914 through to the present.

This has involved two complementary studies. First, a detailed analysis of the changing arc of aerial violence–from the First World War, through the combined bomber offensives against Germany in the Second World War, the bombing of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, to drone strikes over Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen and elsewhere–and second, an account of the embodied nature of modern war, centring on the evacuation of casualties, combatant and civilian, from war zones from 1914 to the present. The two projects have collided in an analysis of attacks on hospitals, healthcare workers and patients in war zones and their implications for both international law and the conduct of later modern war. These studies form part of two book projects, Reach from the Sky: Aerial Violence and the Everywhere War and The Purple Testament of War: Bodies and Woundscapes.

Derek’s research involves both archival work and interviews, but he is also keenly interested in the ways in which imaginative literature and theatrical performance can be incorporated into the research process–he was consulted in the early stages of Owen Sheers’ I Saw a Man and Guy Hibbert’s Eye in the Sky–and has developed a series of performance works related his research. He was awarded the Founder’s Medal of the Royal Geographical Society in 2006 for his contributions to social theory and human geography and blogs regularly at Geographical Imaginations: Wars, Spaces and Bodies.

 

Andy Kent
Editorial Office Manager
August 2018

(cfp) Here Versus There: Beyond Comparison in Queer and Sexuality Politics Setembro 6, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, geografias das sexualidades, geographies of sexualities, sexualidades e géneros, teoria e epistemologia da geografia, Uncategorized.
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(cfp) Here Versus There: Beyond Comparison in Queer and Sexuality Politics

National University of Ireland Maynooth, 18th June 2019

In sexual and gender politics, the Global North can be seen as ‘won’ and ‘sorted’, in contrast to a Global South that needs support to achieve Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and other sexual/gendered rights. This has specific effects both in places such as Ireland and the UK, where the politicisation of sexual and gendered lives moves ‘elsewhere’, and also for these ‘elsewheres’ marked as ‘unsafe’, ‘unfriendly’ and ‘backward’.  This conference is seeking papers, provocations and discussions that investigate both the creation of the binaries of here/there, Global North/Global South in terms of sexual and gender politics, legalities and geographies.

Academics, activists, policy makers and all who are interested are invited to submit a proposal to contribute to this one-day event. Contributions can take multiple forms, including presentations, films and artistic expressions.

It is anticipated that the day will be used to create a proposal for a special issue.

Accessible buildings will be used and there will be a sliding scale for registrations, including a free option for those who cannot pay.  For any other support needs, please let get in touch.

Proposals of no more than 250 words should be submitted here by Friday 30th November 2018: https://goo.gl/forms/Qjy7hC3tiE8EFSRM2.

 For further information please contact Kay Lalor k.lalor@mmu.ac.uk or Kath Browne Kath.Browne@mu.ie

A cidade em reconstrução. Leituras críticas, 2008-2018 Setembro 6, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, activismo, cidades, geografias, teoria social, Uncategorized.
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cidade

A cidade em reconstrução. Leituras críticas, 2008-2018” é um livro recém editado, organizado por André Carmo, Eduardo Ascensão e Ana Estevens, que resulta de uma parceria entre o Le Monde Diplomatique (ed. portuguesa) e a Habita – Associação pelo Direito à Habitação e à Cidade, que têm trazido à discussão um tema tão actual (pode consultar o índice aqui).

Os livros do Le Monde Diplomatique – edição portuguesa são editados pela Outro Modo Cooperativa Cultural, que tal como tantas outras cooperativas em Portugal tenta sobreviver e resistir mensalmente. É um projecto colectivo, político e crítico que edita o jornal e os muitos livros que já foram produzidos. Para garantir a verba necessária para a impressão do livro gostávamos de o convidar a adquirir em sistema de pré-venda o número de exemplares que desejar.

Esta pré-venda está a ser feita junto de amigos do jornal Le Monde Diplomatique – edição portuguesa e daqueles que antecipadamente queiram contribuir para a sua impressão, tendo a vantagem de o ler antes dele ser distribuído em Outubro com o jornal. Se o quiser fazer, contacte o Le Monde Diplomatique para o e-mail livros.lmd.pt@gmail.com.

 

 

Migration and Society – Advances in Researc Setembro 6, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, migrações, Uncategorized.
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Berghahn just announce the launch of an exciting new journal in 2018, Migration and Society: Advances in Research! The first volume will be published this fall. View the Introduction for the forthcoming volume.

Migration and Society  – Advances in Research

Editors
Mette Louise Berg, University College London
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, University College London

Migration is at the heart of the transformation of societies and communities and touches the lives of people across the globe. Migration and Society is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal advancing debate about emergent trends in all types of migration. We invite work that situates migration in a wider historical and societal context, including attention to experiences and representations of migration, critical theoretical perspectives on migration, and the social, cultural, and legal embeddedness of migration. Global in its scope, we particularly encourage scholarship from and about the global South as well as the North.

Migration and Society addresses both dynamics and drivers of migration; processes of settlement and integration; and transnational practices and diaspora formation. We publish theoretically informed and empirically based articles of the highest quality, especially encouraging work that interrogates and transcends the boundaries between the social sciences and the arts and humanities.

We also welcome articles that reflect on the complexities of both studying and teaching migration, as well as pieces that focus on the relationship between scholarship and the policies and politics of migration.

homofobia e racismo no país dos brandos costumes Julho 20, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, activismo, Uncategorized.
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Opinião

Homofobia e Racismo no país dos brandos costumes

Ana Cristina Santos

No caso da agressão em Coimbra, como noutros, o repúdio à homofobia tem que ser tão veemente quanto o repúdio ao racismo.
Aconteceu há uma semana em Coimbra – um casal de namorados foi insultado e violentamente agredido. A motivação do ataque foi incontestavelmente homofóbica. De acordo com várias fontes, o fator desencadeador terá sido um beijo de despedida presenciado por uma família preconceituosa. Mas na verdade o fator que espoleta a agressão não é o beijo, nem tão pouco a orientação sexual das vítimas. Neste caso, como em qualquer outra situação de violência de género, o que desencadeia a agressão é um preconceito que depois se pode traduzir num comportamento violento por parte da pessoa agressora – assim, sem tentativas de contextualização ou de busca de justificação para aquilo que não é admissível. Mas, para além da gravidade inegável dos factos, o grau de visibilidade que este caso conheceu prende-se também com o alinhamento da notícia. O modo como o evento foi descrito pela imprensa num primeiro momento, escolhendo colocar no título a origem étnica das pessoas agressoras, gerou uma vaga de comentários racistas, em número assustador (em volume e em conteúdo), que nos merece uma reflexão atenta e uma intervenção mais eficaz.Importa notar que em anos recentes Portugal conheceu significativas transformações sociojurídicas que decorrem do reconhecimento de que o preconceito com base na sexualidade e na identidade ou expressão de género não é compatível com o projeto de liberdade democrática. Assim foi que, desde 2004, a Constituição da República Portuguesa nos garante que nenhum cidadão ou cidadã pode ser objeto de discriminação por orientação sexual, para citar apenas um dos aspetos dessa transformação legislativa. Pese embora a centralidade do progresso jurídico, o quotidiano tece-se de temporalidades diversas e constrói-se por referência a regras porosas, enraizadas de forma tácita e nem sempre ancoradas num discurso permeável à lógica ou sequer ao apreço pela dignidade humana. E foi assim que, por exemplo, Sara Vasconcelos foi violentamente agredida por um taxista homofóbico no Porto em 2014; ou que um jovem denunciou ter sido espancado por seguranças homofóbicos na Festa do Avante em 2015; ou que um membro da comitiva espanhola do Festival da Eurovisão foi alvo de agressão física de cariz homofóbico em maio deste ano.Mas depois há toda a base da pirâmide que não chega a ser noticiada em detalhe. Segundo um estudo recente desenvolvido por colegas do ISCTE e da Universidade do Porto, três em cada cinco estudantes dizem já ter ouvido comentários homofóbicos por parte de docentes. Estes factos levaram já a declarações importantes por parte do Ministério da Educação que, pela primeira vez na história do país, reconheceu inequivocamente que a homofobia por parte de agentes educativos não é desculpável e será combatida disciplinarmente. Também a secretária de Estado para a Cidadania e a Igualdade, Rosa Monteiro, anunciou um pacote formativo sobre diversidade sexual que irá beneficiar cerca de 800 docentes no âmbito da Estratégia Nacional de Educação para a Cidadania. Em suma, não bastam os preciosos progressos jurídicos – é urgente implementar medidas ativas de combate à homofobia e à transfobia em meio escolar, transversalizar a diversidade sexual, torná-la tão visível quanto banal ela de facto é.Mas, para além dos factos, há, como vimos, o modo como a agressão homofóbica em Coimbra foi noticiada, bem como os comentários que desencadeou. Verificamos que o texto jornalístico desviou o enfoque face ao que estava em causa – violência homofóbica –, remetendo-nos para a constatação de um racismo tentacular e o papel da comunicação social enquanto agente de informação em todo este processo.Regressemos por momentos a 10 de junho de 2005 para recordar o dia em que uma onda noticiosa construiu ativamente um alegado evento com efeitos que perduraram para lá de todos os desmentidos por parte das autoridades competentes. O então designado “arrastão” de Carcavelos, que jamais chegou a acontecer, conhecia assim contornos reais nos efeitos de racismo e xenofobia desencadeados, ainda que os pseudo-eventos descritos num primeiro momento fossem fictícios. Esse incidente passou a constar dos exemplos clássicos de má cobertura jornalística, tendo sido analisado pelo investigador Gonçalo Pereira Rosa e documentado num trabalho notável de Diana Andringa intitulado Era uma vez um arrastão.
Se relativamente ao evento de 2005 a responsabilidade da comunicação social foi reconhecida, da mesma forma urge perceber em 2018 que a linguagem nunca foi isenta e que, como tal, o modo descuidado ou, pelo contrário, responsável como expressamos os mesmos conteúdos noticiosos terá consequências muito distintas. A atenção seletiva à identidade de quem agride traduz uma agenda que é, conscientemente ou não, discriminatória. Não consta que as notícias sobre os ataques homofóbicos acima descritos e que vitimaram uma jovem lésbica no Porto, um jovem gay na Atalaia e um conhecido ator espanhol em Lisboa tenham desencadeado uma vaga de discurso de ódio contra taxistas, empresas de segurança ou clientes da noite lisboeta. A diferença está no preconceito, mas esse preconceito não se alimenta por si só, exige cúmplices que agem por determinação ou por incúria.
No caso da agressão em Coimbra, como noutros, o repúdio à homofobia tem que ser tão veemente quanto o repúdio ao racismo. Com este episódio, que nos entristece a tantos níveis, reaprendemos que, no país em que supostamente ninguém é racista, o racismo mais virulento está afinal por toda a parte. Por fim, o ataque que vitimou este casal gay é uma poderosa ilustração do carácter simultaneamente específico e interseccional da violência, lembrando-nos que a luta contra a discriminação diz respeito a todas as pessoas sem exceção.

A autora escreve segundo o novo Acordo Ortográfico