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(cfp) Heteroactivism, Homonationalism and National Projects Janeiro 8, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias, geografias das sexualidades, geographies of sexualities, lgbt no mundo, queer theory, teoria queer, Uncategorized.
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Heteroactivism, Homonationalism and National Projects

Call for Papers for session at the Royal Geographical Society with Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG) Conference, London 28-30 August 2019

Stefanie C. Boulila (University of Göttingen), Kath Browne (Maynooth University) and Catherine Jean Nash (Brock University),

Call for Papers for a session at the Annual International Conference of the Royal Geographical Society with Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG), London 28-30 August 2019. Sponsored by the Space, Sexualities and Queer Research Group.

It has long been argued that the national project is inherently heteronormative – creating and celebrating specific family forms, as well as reiterating nationalistic visions through gendered and sexualised normativities (e.g. Binnie and Bell, 2000; Sharp, 1996; Yuval-Davis 1997). More recently, investigations of homonationalism have explored the cooption and use of (white) lesbian and gay ‘acceptances’ often in the form of civil unions to reproduce the national project, affirm racial hierarchies and engage in postcolonial military conflict (e.g. Puar, 2007; El-Tayeb 2011, Haritaworn 2012). At the same time there have been new forms of resistances to sexual and gender equalities, including anti-gender campaigns. As an analytical category, heteroactivism opens up a space to examine these phenomena relationally as well as in their heterogeneity (Browne and Nash, 2017).

The securitization of borders, the rise of populism and the far right in allegedly post-racial times require sexual and gendered analyses that engage with the multiplicities of support and oppositions to rights, equalities and intersectional justice. This session seeks explore the multifarious intersections of heteroactivism and nationalist projects. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Race, religion and oppositions to/acceptances of sexual and gender liberations
  • Modernity, Europeaness And LGBT/Women’s rights
  • University Cultural wars and governmental interventions 
  • Sexualities of the far right/populisms
  • Gender Norms and nationalisms
  • Opposing the Oppositions/acceptances Confrontation, debate and protest, the promise of oppositional politics
  • Heteroactivism and homonationalist affirmations

If you are interested in submitting a paper, please send your expression of interest including title, abstract of up to 250 words, and your name and institutional affiliation to the session to kath.browne@mu.ie, sboulil@uni-goettingen.de, and cnash@brocku.ca by 31st January 2019.

(cfp) Lesbian Lives Conference 2019 Janeiro 7, 2019

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, lgbt no mundo, queer theory, sexualidades e géneros.
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Lesbian Lives Conference 2019

The Politics of (In) Visibility

Call for Proposals

University of Brighton, UK, 15-16 March 2019

EXTENDED DEADLINE: 18th January 2019

Following a great response to this years CFP we are extending the deadline to give more people the opportunity to be part of this brilliant event. The theme for the 2019 Lesbian Lives Conference is The Politics of (In) Visibility. The 24th edition of this conference is hosted by the University of Brighton Centre for Transforming Sexuality and Gender in conjunction with feminist scholars from University College Dublin and Maynooth University. The organisers of this two-day international and interdisciplinary conference now welcome proposals from academics, scholars, students, activists, documentary and film-makers, writers and artists.

The Lesbian Lives Conference is not just the world’s most longstanding academic conference in Lesbian Studies, it is a large international event that draws speakers and participants from all continents and hosts the best-known as well as emerging scholars in the field. In the past we have hosted Emma Donoghue, Jackie Kay, Joan Nestle, Sarah Schulman, Cherry Smyth, Del La Grace Volcano, Sarah Waters, Campbell X and academics such as Sara Ahmed, Terry Castle, Laura Doan, Lisa Downing, Lillian Faderman, Sarah Franklin, Claire Hemmings, Alison Hennegan, Sally R. Munt, Helena Whitbread, Bonnie Zimmerman among many others.

Moving beyond the notion of the politics of visibility as meaning only the politics of being ‘out’ or being about erasure from cultural representation, the conference seeks to further probe what the politics of (in)visibility means to the LGBTQ community and individuals today.  With celebrity culture and new media is visibility still a burning issue? Although visibility has increased, there are still media representations drawing predominantly on limiting stereotypes; lesbians, bisexual women and trans folks continue to be marginalised; yet visual activism and expression; from painting, photography, and documentary making to romcoms, comics, YouTube serials, and slasher fiction are at the heart of LBTQ culture.

The conference also would like to invite delegates to think about the politics of (In) visibility beyond visual culture and media representations, to include broader notions of public life and spaces. Gay culture may be increasingly visible in some metropolitan areas but lesbian spaces and places continue to be invisible. Similarly, Pride may be considered a moment of public visibility for the whole of the LGBTQ spectrum, but also in this case visibility is shaped by commercial interests and this again marginalises LBT and other non normative perspectives and experiences. Beyond these particular examples it is also important to consider intersectionality in relation to societal aspects of power that  potentially render identities  either or both in- and hyper visible.

Proposals are welcomed on (though are by no means limited to) the following:

·      The relation of queer to lesbian visibility 

·      Visual activism

·      Revisiting debates about LGBTQ visibility and its discontent

·      (In)visibility and intersectionality

·      (Bi) invisibility in LGBT communities 

·      Visibility in mainstream media 

·      Fake news and tablodisation of sexual identities 

·      Social media and visibility 

·      Lesbian YouTube culture

·      Sexuality and Instagram

·      Dating apps

·      Film and screen studies 

·      Comics

·      Photography 

·      LGBTQ domestic photography and home movies

·      Lesbians in the archives 

·      The visual imprint of subcultures

·      The lesbian lens 

·      The lesbian gaze

·      LBTQ looks 

·      Youth and (in)visibility

·      Visibility and social class / disability/ race/gender

·      Visibility and invisibility of LGBT in museums 

The conference organisers welcome proposals for (A) individual papers, (B) sessions, (C) round table discussions, (D) workshops and (E) visual presentations.  We encourage submissions across all genres, both fact and fiction which align to the conference theme, and which have been produced between 2015-2018.

Lesbian Lives aims to build bridges across disciplines and explore less traditional forms of critical engagement with the politics of (in)visibility. In 2019, this underlying ethos of inclusiveness and dialogue will materialize in a fundraiser exhibition. Under the remit of “The Lesbian Lens”, we invite artists to digitally submit visual work: drawing, painting, photography and video. The exhibition opening will take place on the 15th of March and it will close a week after.

For papers, panels or workshops, please submit proposals of no more than 300 words to: sexgencentre@brighton.ac.uk clearly the information required as per the guidelines below, by the 18 January 2019. For submissions to the exhibition, please send your work to: J.Keane@brighton.ac.uk

If your proposal is selected you may be directed to a formal submission through our contributions and registrations site. For all further details please see https://www.facebook.com/Lesbian-Lives-Conference-2019-316502112413277/

The Lesbian Lives Conference is open to all genders and any political and sexual orientations. There is an ethos of welcome and accessibility. 

We particularly want to extend a welcome to bi and trans communities.

We look forward to welcoming you to the conference and to hearing the exciting papers, participating in the enlivening workshops, watching the phenomenal films and engaging in a process of learning and growth.

For regular conference updates follow us on twitter: @CTSG_Brighton

Best wishes, 

The Lesbian Lives Conference committee 

(cfp) Gayness In Queer Times Novembro 22, 2018

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, queer theory, teoria queer, Uncategorized.
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haleprin

(cfp)  Gayness In Queer Times

Workshop & Conference

University of Brighton, UK

June 13th & 14th 2019

Keynote speaker: Prof David Halperin (University of Michigan)

Author of ‘How To Be Gay’ and ‘Gay Shame’

Invitation from the conveners: Introducing the English translation of Mario Mielli’s 1977 ‘Towards A Gay Communism’, Tim Dean describes Mieli’s articulation of gayness as ‘loosening gayness from an exclusively sexual orientation to something more capacious’ (Mieli 2018:xi). Yet Mieli was writing before the emergence of queer theory, and in contemporary scholarly work around sexuality and sexual identity, queer appears to have achieved a hegemonic status. Over the past decade the articulation of theory or politics that is explicitly gay (rather than queer or LGBTQ) has often been attached to limiting, exclusionary, and oppressive practices, particularly regarding race and gender. As an unsurprising result, in both academia and activism ‘gay’ is frequently framed as the normative, assimilationist, and exclusionary past to queer’s fluid, radical, and inclusive present and future.

Yet critically engaging with what gay and queer mean (or could mean) nowadays can be elided precisely because of this problematic juxtaposition. While in many ways we broadly align ourselves with queer thought, we are sceptical of knee-jerk tendencies to unquestioningly surrender gay to a politics of exclusion and neoliberal assimilationism. We want to challenge and interrogate assumptions of how gay can be known and conceptualised, beyond conflation with / reduction to homosexuality. Consequently, this conference invites a focus explicitly gay scholarships, theories, identities, identifications, politics, cultures, histories, and futures. It asks:

‘Does gay have anything useful to offer in queer times?’

As part of its engagement with this question, the conference will include a limited-attendance half-day workshop with Prof David Halperin, focused on his influential text ‘How To Be Gay’.

We invite scholarly, activist, and artistic submissions. It has always been unclear how far queer scholarship, let alone gay scholarship, escapes a focus on gay men. Therefore we give special consideration to submissions by or about gay women, and gay people with other gender identities. Submissions might discuss some of the following provocations (though contributions beyond these are welcomed):

  • How can gayness be re/conceptualised? – identities, politics, activisms
  • What is gay culture, and what is the state of it now? – race, appropriation, mainstreaming
  • What opportunities and challenges do trans lives offer for understanding gayness?
  • When did gayness become exclusive? – bisexual, lesbian, & other ‘non-straight’ perspectives
  • How does gayness exist beyond gender binaries?
  • What are the vehicles of gay acculturation? – elders, spaces, media
  • How can gay space be made more trans-inclusive? – groups, bars, bedrooms
  • What are the boundaries of gay space, and what happens in its liminalities and margins?
  • Can or should gay escape its Western origins?
  • Do we need a re-engagement with radical gay writing? – histories, activisms, theories

To Apply: Please send abstracts of ~250 words, plus a short bio, to convenor Ian Sinclair (i.a.sinclair@brighton.ac.uk) by Friday Jan 11th 2019. Registration fees are on a sliding scale through £80 (institutional support), £40 (postgrad), and £10 (unsupported). A limited number of travel bursaries are available for presenters without any funding. We are happy to discuss your submission with you before the deadline.

The Gayness In Queer Times conference is convened by Dr Nick McGlynn, Ian Sinclair, and Sophie Monk. It is supported by the University of Brighton’s Centre for Transforming Sexuality and Gender, and the Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics.

(cfp) Close Relations: a multi- and interdisciplinary conference on critical family and kinship studies Novembro 22, 2017

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in queer theory, teoria queer.
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Ellsworth_Braid_Install-BAS

 

Close Relations: a multi- and interdisciplinary conference on critical family and kinship studies (call for papers)
Uppsala University 24-26 October 2018

Few questions raise more heated debate than those of family and kinship, and few areas demonstrate more clearly the interconnectedness of the private and the public. Recent years have witnessed a growing emphasis on “family values” in the EU, with ongoing debates about marriage, migration, procreative practices, parental leave, meanings of childhood, and gendered divisions of (care) labour. In a time marked by globalization and migration, as well as neoliberalism and the rise of nationalism, an increasing recognition of non-conventional families and kin constellations has run parallel with re-affirmations of the nuclear family form. Growing anxieties around the (welfare) state’s (future) ability to care for its citizens also refocuses the family’s caretaking and wealth extending function. The conference Close Relations offers a platform for exploring urgent issues for critical family and kinship studies, across disciplines and areas. We wish to explore how changes in family and kin formation materialize in everyday lives, in stories, in fiction and art; how they are facilitated, contested, or hindered in cultural, political, legal, and medical contexts; how close relations play out, become closer or closed off, in specific contexts and situations.

The conference opens with a plenary lecture at 4 pm Wednesday October 24, and closes at 4 pm Friday October 26; the program comprises plenary lectures and a panel discussion, as well as parallel sessions with paper presentations.

Confirmed plenary speakers are:

David Eng, Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania, US

Susan White, Professor of Social Work, University of Sheffield UK

Rikke Andreassen, Professor of media and communication, Roskilde University DK

For the parallel sessions, we now seek abstracts for 15-minute presentations.

Contributions may address areas including, but not limited to, the following:

Assisted reproductive technologies

The child, the parent, the state – negotiating the child perspective with a focus on migration

Conceptualizing family and kinship

Family/Kinship and sex/intimacy

Migration/Transnational family and kinship

Motherhood, fatherhood, parenthood

Kin/NonKin, care, and responsibility

Kinship beyond the human

Solo by choice or single by chance? – (L)one-parent families

Orphanhood

Queer kinship

Researching family and kinship: critical methodologies

Time and place – the wheres and whens of families and kin

Trans* kinship

Submit abstract (max 300 words) and a brief bio (max 50 words) to helena.henriksson@gender.uu.se no later than January 31, 2018. Please write “abstract famkin” in the subject line. Acceptance will be communicated by the end of February. The conference registration will open no later than May and the registration fee will not exceed 3000 SEK (300 EURO; reduced fee for students).

The Swedish Network for Family and Kinship Studies is a multi-disciplinary network for scholars with an interest in exploring the meanings, boundaries, shifts and continuities in family and kinship, their links to power relations, and how they are maintained or disrupted by cultural values, social practices, or symbolic representations. We explore and develop critical perspectives on family and kinship historically as well as in the present. The Network is funded by FORTE 2016-2018 and based at Uppsala University.

 

(cfp) ‘Doing Sex: Men, Masculinity and Sexual Practices’ Janeiro 25, 2017

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, geografias das sexualidades, geographies of sexualities, queer theory, sexualidades e géneros, Uncategorized.
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the_masculine_mystique

Call for Papers
Doing Sex: Men, Masculinity and Sexual Practices’ Conference
Newcastle University, United Kingdom
July 14-15, 2017
Submission Deadline: February 6th 2017

 

This colloquium aims to bring together the study of sexual practices and desires and critical studies of men and masculinities. We are explicitly interested in returning to some of the provocations of sexology in the twentieth century to think through men’s sexuality today. For Kinsey there is an inherent paradox in “man’s absorbing interest in sex and his astounding ignorance of it; his desire to know and his unwillingness to face the facts.” Whilst we can see some of the failings and problematics in Kinsey, Masters & Johnson, and other Sexologists, it is critical to reflect not simply as criticism of these, but also of what they are suggestive and enlightening.

 

Today, nearly seventy years after the publication of Kinsey’s Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, after the sexual revolution, after the censorship trials, after the rise of feminism, queer theory, increased visibility of trans* and genderqueer identities, and LGBT activism, we wish to ask: what are men doing sexually? Men’s sexual practices, more often than not, are pathologized, diagnosed, managed, treated. Whilst productive and valuable work has been undertaken in the areas of rape culture and sexual violence, this symposium aims to explore the diversity and scope of male sexual practices. More specifically, current discussions on masculinity and sexuality tend to marginalize the fear, the excitement, the shame, the pleasure and the embarrassment that men experience when doing sex. This symposium addresses this by focusing on men doing sex.

 

For more information see: https://doingsexconference.wordpress.com/

What Gender Is, What Gender Does Maio 6, 2016

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, queer theory, teoria queer, Uncategorized.
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what-gender-is-judith-roof

 

Genders are neither binary nor essential. Nor are they singular, unchanging, invariable, inherent, or flatly definitive. Genders are not names, labels, or identities; they are neither nouns nor adjectives. Gender is a verb, a process. Genderings constantly change. Individuals are always more than one gender. These multiple genderings are culturally intelligible.

To gender is to signal, mask, obscure, suggest, mislead, misrecognize, and simplify the uncontainable, uncategorizable chaos of desires and incommensurabilities characteristic of subjects, but energetically contained by society. Gender’s job is always to make the subject fit.

Insofar as one of two binary gender distinctions tends to stand in for and obscure the complex negotiations genders represent, “to gender” is always to reduce, locate, and simplify processes that extend through history from the psychical terrain of the subject to the sociocultural manifestations, ramifications, imperatives, and possibilities attached to genders’ binary resolutions.

Preface of “What Gender Is, What Gender Does” by Judith Roof, University of Minnesota Press, 2016

REVOLUCIÓN por PAUL B. PRECIADO Dezembro 18, 2015

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, activismo, queer theory, Uncategorized.
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qr

Partilho, vindo de Parole de Queer, este texto demasiado bom para não ser partilhado. Partilho uma ideia de questionar e repensar a necessidade de transversalizar as opressões, os movimentos, as ideias, as políticas!

REVOLUCIÓN por PAUL B. PRECIADO

La palabra “pride”, orgullo, tenía sentido en un contexto en el que la homosexualidad y la transexualidad eran consideradas como enfermedades mentales y estaban en muchos casos criminalizadas. Las minorías sexuales llevamos muchos años luchando por la descriminalización, la despatologización y el reconocimiento de los derechos fundamentales. Desde 1969 hemos entrado en un proceso al mismo tiempo de normalización e integración. En simultáneo, han ido apareciendo otras exclusiones, de clase, de raza, de discapacidad que están presentes incluso en contextos en los que la homosexualidad se ha ido progresivamente normalizando y en parte ha habido en los últimos años una reafirmación de las convenciones heteronormativas.

Para mí una palabra que funcionaría hoy mucho mejor que “Orgullo” podría ser “Revolución”. Necesitamos un cambio de paradigma epistémico, el cuestionamiento del marco médico y jurídico en el que se asigna la diferencia sexual. Necesitamos una revolución de nuestros modos de amar, de entender la producción de placer, la filiación. Las minorías sexuales nos sentimos parte de un movimiento más amplio de transformación social, reclamamos un proceso de democratización política total, incluida la democracia sexual, pero sin olvidar la justicia racial, de clase o ecológica.

Uno de los problemas de las luchas actuales es que han quedado atrapadas en las lógicas de la identidad en la que cada movimiento (gay, lesbiano, trans, intersex, etc.) pelea por su propia representación y visibilidad. El reto es establecer alianzas que presten atención a la transversalidad de la opresión y que sean capaces de inventar procesos abiertos de experimentación social para producir otros modos colectivos de vivir.

 

a few things theory knows today Novembro 25, 2015

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, activismo, queer theory, sexualidades e géneros, teoria queer, teoria social, Uncategorized.
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close-up-of-baby-girl-hand-touching-crops-of-wheat-on-the-field-feeling-nature

(clarificando, ou apenas questionando. um pedaço de um belo texto de Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick a que volta e meia regresso. faz-me bem.)

Here are a few things theory knows today.

Or, to phrase it more fairly, here are a few broad assumptions that shape the heuristic habits and positing procedures of theory today (theory not in the primary theoretical texts, but in the routinizing critical projects of ‘‘applied theory’’; theory as a broad project that now spans the humanities and extends into history and anthropology; theory after Foucault and Greenblatt, after Freud and Lacan, after Lévi-Strauss, after Derrida, after feminism) when it offers any account of human beings or cultures:

1. The distance of any such account from a biological basis is assumed to correlate near precisely with its potential for doing justice to difference (individual, historical, and cross-cultural), to contingency, to performative force, and to the possibility of change.

2. Human language is assumed to offer the most productive, if not the only possible, model for understanding representation.

3. The bipolar, transitive relations of subject to object, self to other, and active to passive, and the physical sense (sight) understood to correspond most closely to these relations are dominant organizing tropes to the extent that their dismantling as such is framed as both an urgent and an interminable task. This preoccupation extends tosuch processes as subjectification, self-fashioning, objectification, and Othering; to the gaze; to the core of selfhood whether considered as a developmental telos or as a dangerous illusion requiring vigilant deconstruction.

4. Correspondingly, the structuralist reliance on symbolization through binary pairings of elements, defined in a diacritical relation to one another and no more than arbitrarily associated with the things symbolized, has not only survived the structuralist moment but, if anything, has been propagated ever more broadly through varied and unresting critique—critique that reproduces and popularizes the structure, even as it may complicate an understanding of the workings, of the binarisms mentioned above along with such others as presence/absence, lack/plenitude, nature/culture, repression/liberation, and subversive/hegemonic.

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick “Shame in the cybernetic fold: reading Silvan Tomkins (Written with Adam Frank)” in “Touching Feeling – Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity”, pp. 93-94

 

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(cfp) Trans- Political Economy Outubro 14, 2015

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, queer theory, teoria queer.
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tqs

CALL FOR PAPERS

TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly Issue 4 Volume 1, 2017

Special issue on Trans- Political Economy

Co-editors Dan Irving (dan_irving@carleton.ca) and Vek Lewis (vek.lewis@sydney.edu.au)

Trans* embodiment, subjectivities, networks, advocacy and resistance are mediated by global capitalism and neoliberal regimes of accumulation on national, state and local levels. This issue invites trans scholarship that engages with political economy as an assemblage of dynamic processes that frame but do not completely determine the material lives of non-normatively sexed and/or gendered individuals and communities.

This issue aims to problematize the multidimensional circuits and flows of capital, labour and bodies across various types of borders. How do the material experiences of trans* subjects advance understandings of the political economy of intra- and transnational mobilities? What do the politics of trans migration reveal about the gender/labour/violence nexus and racialized hierarchies that facilitate the advancement of passable bodies while hindering others? How is the legibility of gendered, racialized, sexualized bodies contingent on being properly located in relation to social, economic and cultural capital? How do trans/feminist and other social justice scholars and activists hold particular trans subjectivities (especially trans women) personally responsible for their participation in geopolitical and biocapitalist relations in ways that other gender non-conforming individuals are not?

Debates concerning post-Fordist productive/consumer relations, gender and immaterial labour represent another point of entry for scholarly-activist inquiry into the political economic relations governing these new times. While the expansion of the service economy within post-industrial societies is characteristic of Post-Fordism (e.g. food and hospitality services, childcare, retail), this regime of accumulation emphasizes the centrality of service relations between workers and consumers in all sectors. Capitalist relations exceed narrowly defined economic processes (i.e. commodity production/consumption) and pivot around affective labour, moral or emotional economies.  In other words, individual bodies and personalities are put to work to create positive consumer experiences (i.e. workers’ appearances must be attractive, voices soothing, and behavior must signal enthusiasm, dedication, and/or deference to authority).  How do the un/der/employment experiences of trans men and women, demonstrate the failure of particular bodies to produce feelings of security, safety, belonging, and satisfaction? How does trans labour contribute to economies of desire? What logics and interests underline the criminalization and/or precarity of such labour and the lives and status of those implicated?

We are producing trans- political economic analysis in times of war, economic and ecological crises. Such precarious times demand inter/disciplinary inquiry into the ways that gender non-conforming bodies and/or Trans Studies as a body of literature, artistic and activist production serve as sites of contestation. How are the logics of capital being embodied and resisted on micropolitical levels, through non-profit organizations, via social service agencies and through other efforts to achieve substantive equality and transformative justice?

Possible topics may include:

  • trans* affective economies
  • trans entrepreneurialism and economic empowerment
  • the structural realities of race and gender in locales of trans* mobilities
  • Trans and allied critical work and activism that seeks to interrupt ruling relations of contemporary capital and Empire to forge a transformative and decolonial project of social and economic justice.
  • trans* intranational and international migration
  • Trans Studies as marketable brand
  • trans theories of value
  • criminalized economies
  • neoliberal biopolitics and/or administering life chances
  • economies of trans representation within neoliberal market society
  • accumulation processes and bodies that matter
  • trans/gender and immaterial labour
  • biomedicine and global capitalism
  • Trans sexualities, commodification and re-appropriation in contemporary junctures.
  • Trans lives in the context of parallel powers, para-state formations and economic contention.
  • Capital and the uses/misuses of stigma
  • substantive equality in contradistinction to formal equality
  • trans necro political economies
  • The profitability of “diversity” in neoliberal contexts and discourses
  • Trans lives, states of exception, disposable labour and market value in the shadow of law and state
  • trans* specific and inclusive social service provision in austere times
  • trans subjectivities and class
  • theorizing economic and ecological crisis
  • Politics of public/private in trans lives
  • Trans sexualities, commodification and re-appropriation in contemporary junctures.
  • trans un/der/employment
  • trans networks and circuits of human, cultural and social capital

To be considered, please send a full length submission by January 31, 2016 to tsqjournal@gmail.com. With your article, please include a brief bio including name, postal address, and any institutional affiliation as well as a 150 word abstract with 3-5 keywords. The expected range for scholarly articles is 5000 to 7000 words, and 1000 to 2000 words for shorter critical essays and descriptive accounts. Illustrations should be included with both completed submissions and abstracts. Any questions should be addressed by e-mail sent to the guest editors for the issue: Dan Irving (dan_irving@carleton.ca) and Vek Lewis (vek.lewis@sydney.edu.au).

TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly is a new journal, edited by Paisley Currah and Susan Stryker published by Duke University Press. TSQ aims to be the journal of record for the interdisciplinary field of transgender studies and to promote the widest possible range of perspectives on transgender phenomena broadly defined. Every issue of TSQ will be a specially themed issue that also contains regularly recurring features such as reviews, interviews, and opinion pieces. To learn more about the journal and see calls for papers for other special issues, visit  http://lgbt.arizona.edu/tsq-main.   For information about subscriptions, visit http://www.dukeupress.edu/Catalog/ViewProduct.php?productid=45648.

tqs

privilégio queer? Fevereiro 21, 2015

Posted by paulo jorge vieira in academia, actvismo, queer theory.
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Este texto (que publico no original inglês) obriga a uma leitura atenta. A uma leitura situada. Situada a partir do seu autor e da forma como o lemos. Leitura feita a partir da interseccionalidade das nossas múltiplas posições. A complexidade do conceito de privilégio e o modo interseccional como o este se estabelece social e politicamente, deverá naturalmente questionar o modo como avaliamos as diferentes formas de opressão.

PRIVILEGE FLOWER

‘Queer privilege’ is only a dirty term when you don’t acknowledge your privilege.

The title of this article alone is going to result in me receiving harsh criticisms from members of the queer community, because over the last five years or so the term ‘privilege’ has become part of an overarching social justice lexicon that serves to highlight the ways in which people are inherently treated better than others in society. This, in my mind, is unarguable. The fact that heterosexual people have rights that queer people do not is proof that society in structured unequally. The fact that people with disabilities and mental illness sufferers cannot access adequate services belies that same inequality. The fact that people of colour are disproportionately found to be the victims of violence, poverty, substance abuse, and incarceration all show that things are not equal. What we benefit from is called ‘homonormativity’.

The usual response? ‘I’m not at fault for that merely because I’m (insert: white, straight, cisgender, able-bodied, etc.)’. It’s a strange response, because at no point does the concept of privilege, as outlined above, lay blame at the feet of any individual. It puts the onus on society as a whole – that society’s values, and the practices, actions, behaviours that stem from those very entrenched values. Any free-thinking, rationally-minded person cannot equivocate blaming a society with blaming an individual. It would seem to me, not that these respondents actually believe they are the sole cause of privileged oppression but rather, that they – subconsciously – feel guilty or defensive for not doing anything about it. In essence, they are not acknowledging their privilege.

 The first step is to acknowledge the privileges we both do and do not hold.

I can see that I’m white. I’m not followed around a department store by the suspicious clerk, brow furrowed. I’m able-bodied. I’m not forced to snake my way around campus in a wheel-chair, avoiding stairwells and looking for elevators. I’m male. I’m not scared, walking through the ill-lit streets surrounding my city at night, of being raped. These are all things that make my life immeasurably easier, just because I was born the way I was.

 Similarly, I can see where I don’t have privileges. I’m gay. In my country, I cannot marry, though I’ve seen countless friends from my high school posting lovely pictures of their wedding ceremonies and receptions recently (now that we are all hitting our mid-to-late twenties). I come from a working class family. Other kids got the new gaming console for Christmas, or were not made to ‘grow into’ their school uniform, or were bought a car upon hitting seventeen years old. It seems illogical to say that where you are born on the social ladder doesn’t effect how easy or enjoyable parts of your life are.

The Western, adult gay and lesbian community is very privileged. There I said it (and shall await the influx of emails). As a white, gay, man, I’m pretty sure I’m in a good position to state that. Western homosexuals have hit a point in the zeitgeist where we are fairly insulated from overt forms of discrimination and oppression. We do not receive the death penalty or incarceration for our sexuality; we earn almost comparable wages across a diverse range of industries (not being able to marry or have kids also has the upside of giving us higher disposable incomes and less debt, too); we own houses, run companies, garner fame; we are the subculture that has almost literally taken ownership over the male physique and the quest to perfect it (just as we’re assumed to have contributed the most to the female aesthetic through fashion and design). The mainstream, televised, consumed gay lifestyle includes designer clothes, designer hair, designer teeth, designer stubble, designer abs. Our ‘success stories’ are almost invariably white, able-bodied celebrities (Ru Paul being an exception on the white part). It is an incredibly privileged position to be in – if you conform enough to the cultural expectations of being white, male, able-bodied, or upper-class, then being queer doesn’t get in your way anymore.

However, it would seem, it probably means you are not that queer anymore, either.

I understand the keen need people have for acceptance. I get it. Assimilating into the culture around you serves to protect you from a whole lot of the ill will some elements in society direct at queers. It also has the added bonus (*cough* privilege *cough*) of being much more desirable, in terms of looks, wealth, influence, opportunity, respectability.

The harsh reality is that, just as you cannot conform to being straight, other groups cannot be what they are not. You can be ‘straight-acting’ as much as you want, and society will not see you as a threat to long-held beliefs on sexuality; but femininity will continue to be seen as weak. You can use your whiteness against people on Grindr (“No Asians, Blacks, or Arabs”), but a person of colour cannot erase their race. You can use your income to buy a designer life; working class people cannot trick society into thinking they are upper-class. You can fetishise the perfect body, feeding the gym-junkie obsession; but some physically disabled people will never be able to live up to your standard of beauty. Trans women are hit from all sides – not being seen as a ‘real’ man or woman (whatever that means), being described as ‘mentally ill’, and not being able to afford to transition or receive mental health treatment through disproportionate amounts of poverty and employment discrimination.
These are our privileges. Life is at least a little bit easier for you (and me), for no justifiable reason whatsoever other than the luck of birth. It’s kind of our responsibility to, at a bare minimum, acknowledge that. Once we do, we can get onto the real discussion – what to do about it.